Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The OBS is in the water!

September 16th, 2014

At 0630 on September 15th, after a successful CHIRP survey, rosette test, and styrocast, our team released the first OBS, allowing it to fall 4100 meters to the seafloor. Our first deployment was of an OBS from WHOI, pictured below, and it was followed a couple hours later by an OBS instrument from SIO. This method was adopted to get the members of the watch acclimated to the process of preparing and launching each of these devices. Now, approximately 39 hours later, both watches have fallen into a rhythm, each person comprehending how to efficiently setup and deploy both types of instrument. As a result of our efforts, we are currently ahead of our original schedule! We are currently 16 instruments away from completing our first deployment campaign and are looking forward to beginning to recover our instruments for redeployment. Also, everyone on board to excited to hear that the R/V Langseth has left the dock early on the 16th and is in transit to begin their multi-channel seismic (MCS) surveys!

Until next time,
Dylan Meyer aboard the R/V Endeavor

I would like to thank science (and pressure) for helping us shrink 15 styrofoam cups to approximately a quarter of their original size! (Photo Credit: Dylan Meyer)

A WHOI OBS being prepared for deployment at night. The SIO OBS lays ready for later deployment just off to the left. (Photo Credit: Dylan Meyer)

An OBS from WHOI about to be released. (Photo Credit: Dylan Meyer)

A small rain squall on the horizon is a common occurrence out here. Personally, I find them very refreshing! (Photo Credit: Dylan Meyer)

Sunset on September, 16th. I swear this photo is unedited. (Photo Credit: Dylan Meyer)

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