Friday, September 26, 2014

And then there was data…..


It’s been a week since we deployed all of our gear and started steaming along our lines, so now we have amassed a lot of data!  Although we can only steam at very low speeds while towing the equipment (~4.5 nautical miles an hour or  ~5 mph), each time we fire the air gun array, the 636 channels on the seismic streamer listen for returning sound waves for 18 seconds and record a total ~25 Mb of data. Repeat that every 30 seconds for 7 days, and it begins to add up!  We now have 400 Gb of seismic data alone, not including all of the other types of data we collect while underway (bathymetry, magnetics, gravity).  We are a data-collecting machine.  

Matt, Jenna and Derek sit  back and watch the data roll in from the Main Lab

Not only are we collecting data, we are also doing some preliminary data analysis to get a first look at the geology hidden below the ocean, which is always exciting.

Kara and Matt are entranced by velocity analysis
Although we are only a week in, our data collection has already taken us through water depths as shallow as 20 m and as deep as 6000 m.  At the edge of the continental shelf, water depths change rapidly from ~500 to ~3000 m over just 20 km – a slope of 10%.  For perspective, that’s very similar in elevation change and slope to the course for the Pikes Peak marathon.

Perspective view of seafloor depth from MGDS across the continental slope overlain by a higher resolution swath of bathymetric data that we acquired along our transect, which is also shown projected onto the seafloor.
We have also traveled over widely variable geology – from 35-km-thick continental crust to ~7-km-thick oceanic crust, and from sediment thicknesses of 5 m to over 7 km.   Our data are also revealing cool structures in the sediments and crust – faults, sediment waves, and more.  Below is a picture of a salt diapir that we imaged at the edge of the continental margin.  The salt was probably first deposited at least 150 millions years ago in a flat layer, but as more sediments were deposited on top of it, it got squeezed up and out into dramatic diapirs.

Preliminary image of a salt diapir in seismic reflection data near the base of the continental slope. The y-axis shows the time it takes for a sound wave to travel down in the earth and back again. This images shows about ~5 km down into the earth below the seafloor.
 Donna Shillington aboard the R/V Langseth

First day of land deployment - showing kids how cool seismology is - by Kara Jones


(Originally posted on September 12)

Today was the first day of the onshore deployment of the RT130s through southern Virginia and North Carolina. My partner, Yanjun Hao, and I, were just one of five teams working to deploy instruments along the two survey lines. We deployed the first two instruments at West Harnett Middle School and South Hartnett Elementary School, both outside of Lillington, NC. In both case, the fifth and sixth graders were very interested in learning about what we were doing and eager to participate. I explained to them the basic concept of P and S-waves and then asked the children to jump so that we could test that each of the channels on the sensors was working correctly. They very much enjoyed getting to see on the clié exactly what the signal they generated looked like. At both schools, I was surprised how much the children, and the teachers, knew about earthquake seismology and the intelligent questions they asked. A teacher asked whether they would detect the explosives detonated at nearby Fort Bragg, and a sixth grader named Gauge blew me away when he asked if the sensors would be able to record the sound waves generated by the planes or nearby explosions! In total, we probably spoke to 100 kids about the project today. It was a very encouraging to see how excited and interested they all were in the science. When we first arrived and explained that we would be installing a seismometer, a 5th grade teacher looked at us with wide eyed and asked "Are you seismologists?!" I nodded yes and she was so excited she started jumping up and down. Despite some rain and GPS trouble later in the day, the excitement that the elementary and middle schoolers showed about seismology was enough to make it a great start to the deployment.

At South Hartnett Elementary School in Anderson Creek, NC. I am showing one fifth grade class what the seismic signal they just generated looks like on the clié.

The land instruments

As a volunteer on the GeoPRISMS experiment I was given the opportunity to learn about active seismic onshore survey deployment. The deployment took place from September 8 to 16. During that time the team deployed 80 RT130s along the two seismic profiles in North Carolina and Virginia.  We first prepared the instruments and learned how to deploy them. 


Synchronizing the GPS clocks of the RT130 before deployment in the courtyard of the instrument center. Each instrument is powered by a deep cycle battery.

Pnina Miller (IRIS/PASSCAL) shows how to correctly orient the GPS antenna during the volunteer training
After the preparation we independently deployed the seismometers along the two profiles. Ana Corbalán and I installed 16 RT130s along the southern profile.  
 
Ana and I on our way to our next seismic station
The insulation was tough but gratifying. The weather in North Carolina is unpredictable. At times it was hot and humid. I was drenched in sweat burying the sensors. Other times we were caught in torrential downpours working under a tarp; terrified by the sound of thunder. The sites were located on mostly private property, hosted by people who were eager to help with the experiment. The interaction with the local people enriched the experience. Many of them showed true southern hospitality. 
 
Station deployed!

From an academic prospective I learned about survey design, instrument deployment and the logistics. This provided a distinctly unique experience that is unavailable in the classroom environment. Beatrice and Dan were tremendously helpful and supportive. I learned a great deal about active seismic from my conversations with them. They’re passionate about nurturing future geophysicist. The GeoPRISMS is an altruistic endeavor for them. I am thankful to them for investing so much of their time and expertise into the project. 

The GeoPRISMS experiment has been an overwhelmingly positive experience. I am grateful to have been given the opportunity to help with the deployment and look forward to my involvement in the recovery of the instruments! A future workshop will be held for processing the data and the inversions. This pre to post educational approach is invaluable to me as a future geophysicist.

Posted by Christopher Novitsky 

The Land Deployment Team!

From L-R: Yanjun Hao, David Boyd, Dam Lan, Ana Corbalan, Christopher Novitsky, Pnina Miller, Jason Leiker, Kara Jones, Beatrice Magnani (front), James Farrel (back), Dan Lizarralde.
It took us a while, but here we are, the team that deployed the land seismometers on Sept 12-15. The instruments are now continuously recording the Langseth shots and will continue recording for few more weeks. The East Carolina University in Greenville, NC graciously allowed us to use one of the research facilities on their West Campus (a place with a fascinating story - blog on that coming soon!) as the headquarter for operations. We will be back to the field at the end of October to pick up the instruments, download/save the data and demob.

Posted by Beatrice Magnani

The Night Watch in Action!

We've captured the process of recovering and deconstructing a Scripps OBS thanks to Harm's nifty GoPro camera attached to the crane. This OBS was a little tricky to hook, but otherwise it was a smooth recovery!


video

Time series of the recovery after the OBS has been attached to the crane. Photo Credit: Ernie Aaron.



See ya'll later,
Jenny Harding
R/V Endeavor