Thursday, September 18, 2014

Transit update and food for thought

September 18th, 2014

I was awoken early this morning, after only a few hours of sleep, by some unknown portion of my subconscious and was struck by a thought concerning the unique nature of performing science at sea. The ocean, as a scientific laboratory, forms a constant connection with those who venture into it that is experienced by few, if any, terrestrial experimentalists. During my 12-hour watch, my mind is clearly engaged by the science that we are performing. When is the next instrument being deployed? What needs to be done to be ready for it? Will we survey this instrument once it rests on the seafloor? These are just a few examples of the many questions that cross not only my mind, but the minds of my peers as well. More interestingly, however, I also find that I am acutely aware of changes to my environment, which readily defy alterations in our scientific progress, even as I lay semi-conscious in my bunk. The temporal spacing between the response of the 12hz Echosounder pinging against the hull informs me of any relative change in depth from the last time I was awake. The direction and intensity of the ship’s sway can tell me about our heading and/or a change in weather conditions. A variation in the output frequency of the engine’s constant drone provides me with our current speed and suggests what kind of scientific activity the other watch might be performing one deck above my head. It the result of these types of observations that those aboard these floating beasts that operate 24-hours a day are constantly engaged in their environment, whether or not they desire to be. Anyways, perhaps this helps orient those who have never been to sea for an extended period or recalls reflection for those who have ventured out into the wild blue yonder previously, either way I felt it was an interesting thought worth sharing.

Currently, the R/V Endeavor is a little over halfway through its transit back to the end of Line 2. Along the way, we surveyed OBS Sites 210 and 211 to accurately locate each device on the seafloor which will assist with our recovery. Once we reach the eastern end of Line 2, before starting our recovery operations, we will perform a rosette test. However, the event that all the scientific party is looking forward to is passing by the R/V Langseth sometime early evening and waving ‘hello’ to our scientific comrades.

Till next time,
Dylan Meyer aboard the R/V Endeavor

One of the crew, Chris, noticed this awesome moth that landed on deck yesterday. A clear sign that we were close to shore (Photo Credit: Dylan Meyer)

After passing through a heavy squall, we were rewarded with a full rainbow! (Photo Credit: Dylan Meyer)

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